Welcome to the North American MGB Register

The North American MGB Register (NAMGBR) is an international MG car club serving the needs of the MGB, MGC, MG Midget, MG 1100/1300 and Post Abingdon MG owners, across North America.
Our club is run and elected by the membership for the membership. We are a registered 501(c)7 Not-For-Profit corporation and have been established since 1990.
We hold an annual convention and car show in North America in the summer each year and this is hosted by one of our Affiliate Chapters highlighting the chapter’s local area. Our Annual General Meeting (AGM) is held in October of each year at the location of the following year’s convention & car show. All members are invited to attend the AGM.
There are also NAMGBR sanctioned and supported regional events which may enable you to get to a NAMGBR show in the event that the annual convention is too far for you to travel to.
mgdriver-logoWe publish our world famous The MG Driver magazine six times a year in full color.
Our magazine features updates from the officers, member submitted articles on technical matters, projects or trips, reports on local and regional car shows and events, technical and troubleshooting advice by our Technical Coordinator, the renowned John Twist and an update on upcoming events.
Within the overall club, there are specific sub-registers that support specific models of MGs that collectively make up NAMGBR. We also have some specialty registers for certain unique categories of MGs.
MGB, MG Midget, MG 1100/1300, MGC, and Post Abingdon MGs, such as the MGF, MG TF and RV8 all have a register, with a register head focussed on that group of MGs. There are also specialty registers for: the MGB Limited Editions, the early “Pull Handle” MGBs, 1967 MGB GT Specials, MGB V8’s and the 1974 1/2 MGBs. See the Registers page for all the details and register head contact information.
As an individual member there are many benefits of membership which starts at just $30 per year. You can find all the details and specifics on the Join Us page.
We also have Affiliate Chapters/Clubs and the requirements to be an affiliate chapter are fairly simple and in return the affiliated club gets great benefits such as event and director and officer liability insurance. Start with the Join Us page and also see the Resources page as well for all the details.
Resources – lots of them! As in individual member you’ll benefit from things like the MG Driver magazine, Mutual Aid Directory (MAD), Service Recommendations, NAMGBR Facebook Group and if you’re not a member in a local club, we can help you find one.
As an Affiliate Chapter you can be covered by the umbrella event liability and director and officer insurance policy. Additionally we’ll direct new members to your club if they are not currently members.
Just visit the Resources page for more details.
Platinum Sponsors

Latest NAMGBR & MG News

The NAMGBR Facebook Group Feed

Hmmm think his cruising is done for this year 😂 ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

Hmmm think his cruising is done for this year 😂

Alex Redding, Steven Gorr and 12 others like this

View previous comments

Michael StellaPhotoshop for humor or real?? Now that would ruin anyone's day!

3 days ago
Avatar

Shaun JohnsonSomeone's day is about to turn to crap.

3 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Jim SweeneyPeter Mittler, that kinda looks like 'Itch'

3 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Charles de BourbonTailgate lesson coming up.

1 day ago
Avatar

John RogersIt's about to hit the fan.

4 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Buckle up Buckaroos MGB montage ... See MoreSee Less

14 hours ago

Jim DeatschWhat does THIS have to do with MGBs?

7 hours ago
Avatar

Greene TaylorThe car is a MGB

6 hours ago
Avatar

Greene TaylorWatch it

6 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

What's a tried & true best protection for my MGB which invested 20k into and countless man hours. Alarms GPS remote wireless detection trackers???? That risky time where you leave your MG in a parking lot beach movies bar restaurant store or park. I would rather not come out to empty space after my build is finally coming to point it will be driven often. ... See MoreSee Less

6 days ago

Gordon Weddle, Bob Myrick and 1 other like this

View previous comments

Danny ThomasonOk, GPS doesn't keep your classics car from getting stolen. It only helps you possibly recover it. However, a lot of damage may already be done, (broken windows, cut top, wrecked in police chase, jacked up dash or steering column, etc.). Alarms only provide minor protection. A true car thief can disable an alarm in seconds. It basically only deters joy riders and kids. A method of disabling is best, (like a lock bar on the steering wheel, cut off switch, etc.). But again, most professional car thiefs don't drive them away. They are usually towed. Best bet is to pay attention where you park it. Put it in safe areas, well lit, high traffic / high profile areas etc. Don't leave it alone unattended for long periods of time. And lastly.....purchase a GOOD Agreed Value Insurance policy. Luckily, our classic MG's are not high theft targets. Most stolen cars are stolen for the parts / chop shop opportunities, (other than the kid / joy ride situations). And the resale market for our MG parts is very small. Professional car thiefs would rather take a modern Camry, Accord or Chevy truck....not a rare classic car.

6 days ago
Avatar

Joe StoutI am still in the process of getting my B back on the road, but have been told by a few people never to lock the doors, because someone will just cut the top to get in :-) I have a kill switch that could easily be found if someone were to snoop around, and actually found a new in the box "THE CLUB" steering wheel lock at my in-laws house. I was joking about using that, BUT - it may not be a bad idea.

6 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Mike RobinsonI don't think anything is 100% theft proof, the best we can do is make it as difficult as possible and to make it take as long as possible. When I rewired my car I put in the obvious battery switch, which also disables the fuel pump, and I have two hidden switches - an additional one for the fuel pump and one for the positive side of the coil. My thinking is that even if they find the main battery switch, it will take them too much time to find the other switches and they will move on to an easier target. If the have the time and can tow it would be the only way they will be able to remove it, assuming they can get it out of the garage that is also alarmed. The best recourse is adequate theft insurance to cover your losses. I have an agreed value policy with J.C. Taylor that covers my investment, not the actual value of the car, which is far less than I have put into it.

6 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Kurt WienhorstHaving 2 cars I would hate to lose one being my B-GT and the other an AC Cobra I use all listed above. Cut off switches are helpful but neither are left unattended in lots that I can't view from an establishment I am visiting..... Other than an occasional hotel where it sits with many similar autos. Overnight for a car show.

6 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Simon DixCan't speak to the devices but the suggestions of discreet kill switches make a lot of sense. Correct "agreed value" insurance is also the best way to go for a classic for every reason and not just theft. There are several options available from good Classic Car and some General Insurance companies but "agreed value" is the important bit. NAMGBR happens to have a 5% saving offer from Hagerty Insurance for our members (of the club itself not just the FB Group). I personally have been with them for about 10 years. namgbr.org/resources/hagerty-insurance-discount/

Hagerty Insurance Discount » NAMGBR6 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Danny ThomasonBased on the original posting.....as a classic car owner, my biggest fear would not be how I protect my $20k and countless man hours in my classic car from theft. It would be how do I protect that car from parking lot damage, (door dings, shopping cart crashes, dirty hands and touching, being bumped by bumpers....etc.). I own multiply classic cars and I would never leave one of my cars in a parking lot at the movies, at the beach etc. unattended. The fear of damage is MUCH greater than the fear of theft.

6 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

Avatar

Russell PutnamI only drive my mgb gt to car show or drive around the town.

6 days ago
Avatar

Steve A. HollanderI have a kill switch in the hatch area of my BGT. If it sits for more than a week or so, I turn the battery off. Would also be useful for parking in qestionable areas, which I rarely do.

6 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

Avatar

Dino PerezThe cheap way is to add a wireless baby monitor,wakes you up on first noise....

6 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Steve A. HollanderGreat idea, except for that limited range thing . . . :)

6 days ago
Avatar

Jack LongAgree on a battery isolation switch. Mount it to the bulkhead behind the passenger seat, down low and out of sight, and get one with a removable key. Buy a good one from Jegs or Summit, and break the ground wire, not the hot one. And be comforted that 95% of car thieves these days cannot drive a stick shift!

6 days ago
Avatar

Bill HibberdSteering wheel bar.

6 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Rick IngramI take the rotor out. You could do the same with the coil wire.

6 days ago
Avatar

Danny ThomasonBack in the day, when my MGs were daily drivers, not classic cars....I would take the coil wire and swap it with the #1 plug wire at the cap. That way, to the initial eye, everything looked normal....but it wouldn't start.

6 days ago
Avatar

Scott HowerAs Rick says, remove the dizzy rotor. If you have a CBB without OD, it takes 30 secs to wire the fuel pump thru the OD switch. Thief might get a mile away on the residual fuel in the float bowls. Go here and scroll toward the bottom. www.chicagolandmgclub.com/techtips/mgb/od_overview.html

6 days ago
Avatar

G F Mat MateckoHad a friend who went in to a grocery store on his way home for a few items ... while waiting in line he saw his Porsche 928 being winched onto a trailer. While he stopped it, the solution is likely one of the devices that can track the position of the car. And good insurance coverage.

6 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Alex ReddingYour stick shift is your best theft deterrent , an in line fuel pump switch hidden would also help. GPS remote for pros

6 days ago   ·  2
Avatar

Steven GorrI'd guess that most of today's young joyriders would like be stymied by that 3rd pedal.

5 days ago
Avatar

Neal A. LevyEveryone is right. Stick is huge. Just insure it well and enjoy the car.

5 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Joe StoutI know - this is probably over-kill, but I liked the Perko Marine Battery switch - it fit nicely behind the passenger seat. Not hidden, but I was looking for something to kill everything when I had the car parked in garage.

Attachment5 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

Avatar

Sandia SchleyFull coverage policy.

2 days ago   ·  1
Avatar

Mike RacineBattery disconnect. I put mine in the trunk, which can be locked. Easy and cheap.

1 day ago   ·  1
Avatar

Diane Macy KirbyMy husband likes a good old fashioned locking steering wheel bar. A Club.

8 hours ago
Avatar

Comment on Facebook

Click here to visit/request to join our Facebook group