Welcome to the North American MGB Register

The North American MGB Register (NAMGBR) is an international MG car club serving the needs of the MGB, MGC, MG Midget, MG 1100/1300 and Post Abingdon MG owners, across North America.
Our club is run and elected by the membership for the membership. We are a registered 501(c)7 Not-For-Profit corporation and have been established since 1990.
We hold an annual convention and car show in North America in the summer each year and this is hosted by one of our Affiliate Chapters highlighting the chapter’s local area. Our Annual General Meeting (AGM) is held in October of each year at the location of the following year’s convention & car show. All members are invited to attend the AGM.
There are also NAMGBR sanctioned and supported regional events which may enable you to get to a NAMGBR show in the event that the annual convention is too far for you to travel to.
mgdriver-logoWe publish our world famous The MG Driver magazine six times a year in full color.
Our magazine features updates from the officers, member submitted articles on technical matters, projects or trips, reports on local and regional car shows and events, technical and troubleshooting advice by our Technical Coordinator, the renowned John Twist and an update on upcoming events.
Within the overall club, there are specific sub-registers that support specific models of MGs that collectively make up NAMGBR. We also have some specialty registers for certain unique categories of MGs.
MGB, MG Midget, MG 1100/1300, MGC, and Post Abingdon MGs, such as the MGF, MG TF and RV8 all have a register, with a register head focussed on that group of MGs. There are also specialty registers for: the MGB Limited Editions, the early “Pull Handle” MGBs, 1967 MGB GT Specials, MGB V8’s and the 1974 1/2 MGBs. See the Registers page for all the details and register head contact information.
As an individual member there are many benefits of membership which starts at just $30 per year. You can find all the details and specifics on the Join Us page.
We also have Affiliate Chapters/Clubs and the requirements to be an affiliate chapter are fairly simple and in return the affiliated club gets great benefits such as event and director and officer liability insurance. Start with the Join Us page and also see the Resources page as well for all the details.
Resources – lots of them! As in individual member you’ll benefit from things like the MG Driver magazine, Mutual Aid Directory (MAD), Service Recommendations, NAMGBR Facebook Group and if you’re not a member in a local club, we can help you find one.
As an Affiliate Chapter you can be covered by the umbrella event liability and director and officer insurance policy. Additionally we’ll direct new members to your club if they are not currently members.
Just visit the Resources page for more details.

The NAMGBR Facebook Group Feed

Who makes seats in Mexico City ? ... See MoreSee Less

21 hours ago

Comment on Facebook

You realize that they just had a serious earthquake there yesterday so turn around time may be a bit long.......

We’re trying to find more members in Mexico. We know there are MGs there!

This may be the solution to your carburetor problems...and everything you need is available at your local hardware store. ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Comment on Facebook

Love Red Green!!

Caveat: Maudlin subjective ramblings...from an MGB lover.

Just a thought.... I'm sort of confused as to why in a community celebrating a particular car/marque/love seems to be so riddled with horror stories, fear, and myths. I'm 62 years old and have loved LBCs my whole life. I drove many of them throughout the years as daily drivers. Now I grant you, as someone who took up mechanics as a livelihood, I'm going to get some of that, "Well, as a mechanic of course you're not scared of them." thing, but the fact that I have worked on just about everything over the years also gives me insight that others do not have. I find that for the most part, LBCs are simpler than most other cars. They are no more prone to failure than anything else from my experience. Most of listening to horror stories over the years has taught me that an awful lot of these cars suffered abuse and neglect far worse than other cars simply because people would keep them longer before giving up on them, or buy a worn out car to begin with because they fell in love with the car in the first place. Having driven 3000s, Spridgets, GT6s, Bs/GTs, TR4s, an Alpine, a TR-250, and a Series II XJ-6 as daily drivers, I have as my permanent car a mostly 1972 MGB roadster. The were all reliable and fun. But I did what had to be done in order to make them that way. The majority of the cars had debilitating issues, usually caused by abuse and neglect. I have used at least a half dozen cars that I pulled from complete abandonment as daily drivers, my current B included.I have partially (Street refresh) to fully (Nut & bolt) restored more than 50 MGBs in my career, and I can honestly say that Bs are freakin' awesome. Yes, there are others that are prettier, faster, more luxurious, blah, blah, blah, but none IMNSHO that are the best combination of hardy, reliable, comfortable, and dead simple to keep on the road. And I would have to say that any B that I ran into trouble with over the years was customers' cars that had someone who didn't know what they were doing trying, and failing, to repair the car properly. To me, it's kind of a litmus test of a mechanic.....if you can't keep a B on the road, then you probably shouldn't work on *any* car. They're that basic and straightforward. What I'd like to see/hear more of are stories/anecdotes from people, like me, who have lots of great experiences with our lovely Bs, and will have theirs for life.

Here's ours just sitting prior to an afternoon run. I restored this for a friend of mine some 20-odd years ago, bought it from him six and a half years ago, and have put 28,000 miles on it doing virtually nothing to it except some minor maintenance. I *know* it will start right up, take me there, and bring me home. Every time.
... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago

Caveat: Maudlin subjective ramblings...from an MGB lover.

Just a thought.... Im sort of confused as to why in a community celebrating a particular car/marque/love seems to be so riddled with horror stories, fear, and myths. Im 62 years old and have loved LBCs my whole life.  I drove many of them throughout the years as daily drivers. Now I grant you, as someone who took up mechanics as a livelihood, Im going to get some of that, Well, as a mechanic of course youre not scared of them. thing, but the fact that I have worked on just about everything over the years also gives me insight that others do not have. I find that for the most part, LBCs are simpler than most other cars. They are no more prone to failure than anything else from my experience. Most of listening to horror stories over the years has taught me that an awful lot of these cars suffered abuse and neglect far worse than other cars simply because people would keep them longer before giving up on them, or buy a worn out car to begin with because they fell in love with the car in the first place. Having driven 3000s, Spridgets, GT6s, Bs/GTs, TR4s, an Alpine, a TR-250, and a Series II XJ-6 as daily drivers, I have as my permanent car a mostly 1972 MGB roadster. The were all reliable and fun. But I did what had to be done in order to make them that way. The majority of the cars had debilitating issues, usually caused by abuse and neglect. I have used at least a half dozen cars that I pulled from complete abandonment as daily drivers, my current B included.I have partially (Street refresh) to fully (Nut & bolt) restored more than 50 MGBs in my career, and I can honestly say that Bs are freakin awesome. Yes, there are others that are prettier, faster, more luxurious, blah, blah, blah, but none IMNSHO that are the best combination of hardy, reliable, comfortable, and dead simple to keep on the road. And I would have to say that any B that I ran into trouble with over the years was customers cars that had someone who didnt know what they were doing trying, and failing, to repair the car properly. To me, its kind of a litmus test of a mechanic.....if you cant keep a B on the road, then you probably shouldnt work on *any* car. Theyre that basic and straightforward. What Id like to see/hear more of are stories/anecdotes from people, like me, who have lots of great experiences with our lovely Bs, and will have theirs for life.

Heres ours just sitting prior to an afternoon run. I restored this for a friend of mine some 20-odd years ago, bought it from him six and a half years ago, and have put 28,000 miles on it doing virtually nothing to it except some minor maintenance. I *know* it will start right up, take me there, and bring me home. Every time.

Comment on Facebook

After MANY years of driving MG's, Lotus', Healeys, and lord knows what else i agree. Keep up with minor maintenance and all will be well!!

Spot on, Mr. Boyd!

MGB's have always been the "cheap and cheerful" British sports car ... yes, many were put on the deferred maintenance plan from time to time by impecunious owners, but even those neglected cars are salvageable with a little effort and time. To me, they represent an amazing 'bargain' in todays collector car hobby.

Impecunious students who owned clapped out LBCs 20-40 years ago & had no idea how to take care of them are now trying to relive their youth through LBCs. They have more money but most still have no idea how to take care of them. Most modern mechanics have no experience repairing carberated, non coputerized cars. Join a car club, find an auto mechanic rather than an automotive technician. Expect it to cost more than it did in 1970.

I've had several over the years and enjoyed every one of them. The one I have now is a daily driver and I have had it for about 18 years. It's definitely a keeper.

What a story, going to print and frame this message! God bless ya buddy!

Absolutely correct!

What I'm hoping is for people to post good, happy things about their life with MGBs. Like the fact that if you drive down the road in your BGT in a Santa Claus suit, EVERBODY waves!

Here is a picture of our "Maggie". Owned for over 20 years. Over 100,000 miles of blissful driving. 1 Grand Champion award for winning the Moss Motoring Challenge. A couple of weddings, lots of parties, Many car shows, charity runs and millions of smiles. Keep the maintenance up and drive the heck out of them.

Very true my wife and I have had our MGB for 34 years and it's been a great car all that time!

I completely agree with you, Jeb Boyd. In my 50 years of owning, driving, wrenching on, racing & restoring MGs, I have formed the opinion that at least 99% of the "failures" MG owners talk about (and blame their MGs for) are actually "self-inflicted" wounds. Of all the wonderful cars to come out of England, in the 60s & 70s, I think the MGB is the most "bullet-proof" one of them all.

You gotta drive them! I've been driving my current 1966 MGB for more than 15 years now, and it is my daily driver most days, three seasons of the year. I've driven it on many long-distance trips, including cross country and back, and I don't hesitate to drive it anywhere, any distance. Drive MGB's daily, and they will take you where you want to go.

Thanks Jeb, I feel much better about myself and my fleet of two MGBs

People tend to like maintenance free these days but fail to realize that isn't going to happen on a 40+ year old car. MGBs need either an owner willing to pay someone to maintain it or learn how to themselves, otherwise they become horror stories.

This shot tells one of two tales only. These are machines, and they break. Happily, they are very simple machines, so they are easily repaired, as already mentioned. This is my Midget enroute to San Diego for MG2017 after blowing a head gasket. Once repaired ( under a shade tree on the roadside ) the car never missed a beat for the remaining 4,000 miles of our trip. Just to prove a point, the modern Chrysler Sebring in our group also broke down, but had to be taken to a shop for computer diagnostics to determine the cause of its engine stumbling and de rating.

+ View previous comments

I'm hoping someone can help me pin point a value on a 1964 MGB. Here is a picture of what I'm looking at. Where is the best place to try and determine a value based on condition? ... See MoreSee Less

19 hours ago

Im hoping someone can help me pin point a value on a 1964 MGB. Here is a picture of what Im looking at. Where is the best place to try and determine a value based on condition?

Comment on Facebook

Honestly, it depends. Are you buying it for fun, or resale? Chrome bumper cars are worth more than rubber bumper cars. Usually go for around $4000 to $6000.

I would be buying it to keep

You could look at a few auction results (Sports Car Market Magazine keeps a online register) - remember that auction prices include a typical 10% sale fee to the buyer, and a similar fee to the seller --- so if the sale is stated as $10k, that includes about $2k in commissions, so the seller gets about $8k.

Hit Hagerty.com for values of #1 (perfect/concourse) to #4 (issues). I bought a solid '64 with som issues, sorted them all, detailed it, refreshed here and there, and sold it for $12k. Buyer got a GREAT car!!

I filtered Hemmings for you. Seems like 10-20k depending on the condition. Overall probably that 12-15k range. Metal dash models seem to get a bit more also www.hemmings.com/classifieds/?0=0&adtypeFacet=Vehicles%20for%20Sale&makeFacet=MG&modelFacet[]=B&country[]=US&year_rangeFacet[]=1960%27s&sort=sort_time_desc&page_size=15&yearFacet=1964

I have lots of parts for 63-66 , reasonable 🚗

Kevin Kevin Powell if you will PM me details, I will help you pinpoint an accurate value

Don't get carried away with values for #1 or #2 condition cars. VERY few of our cars are better than #3. First part of definition for a #1 car: "it is not driven". A #3 is a damn nice car. Unless this is a perfect car in every way, normally stored in a climate-controlled facility, I would stick to values for a #3 car. FWIW...

Kevin, post your query to the MG Experience website, but include more information on the car. Condition is everything, as the cost to remedy issues can double or treble the cost. Photo looks like an non-original colour, and that is a minus for value. Originality does bring the most money, with rare exceptions for restomodded MGBs that are done to a very high standard.

I notice it says "restoration" which can be a red flag so be careful . agree with the other poster MG Experience which is a chat room is the best place for advice on M G matters put the information on there and within a couple of hours you will have a dozen posts from people who know more about MG cars than I ever will

+ View previous comments

Click here to visit/request to join our Facebook group